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  • Effective: 4/27/2010
  • Revision:
  • Reviewed: 12/29/2012

  1. Board Policy
    The District’s Protected Health Information Privacy Policy is designed to comply with the provisions of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA). HIPAA restricts the District’s ability to use and disclose protected health information. The administration is charged with the administration of this policy.
  2. Definitions
    1. Protected health information (PHI): Information created or received by the Plan and related to the past, present, or future physical or mental health or condition of a participant and that identifies the participant or for which there is a reasonable basis to believe the information can be used to identify the participant. Protected health information includes information of persons living or deceased.
    2. Workforce: The District’s workforce includes individuals who would be considered part of the workforce under HIPAA such as employees, volunteers, trainers, and other persons whose work performance is under the direct control of the District, whether or not they are paid by the District.
    3. Employee: Includes all types of workers listed above.
    4. Privacy Official: The Privacy Official will serve as the contact person for participants who have questions, concerns, or complaints about the privacy of their PHI.
  3. Administrative Policy
    Jordan School District (the District) self-administers a group health plan (the Plan). Members of the District’s workforce have access to individually identifiable health information of Plan participants (1) on behalf of the Plan itself; or (2) on behalf of the District, for administrative functions of the Plan. Members of the District’s workforce who have access to PHI must comply with this privacy policy. No third party rights, including, but not limited to, rights of Plan participants, beneficiaries, covered dependents or business associates, are intended to be covered by this policy. The District reserves the right to amend or change this policy at any time (and even retroactively) without notice.
  4. Plan’s Responsibilities as Covered Entity
    1. Privacy Official and Contact Person
      The director of Insurance Services shall be the Privacy Official for the Plan.
    2. Workforce Training
      Employees with access to PHI will receive training on privacy policies and procedures. A training schedule will be developed so that all employees with access to PHI receive the training necessary and appropriate to permit them to carry out their functions within the Plan.
    3. Technical and Physical Safeguards and Firewall
      Technical and physical safeguards to prevent PHI from intentionally or unintentionally being used or disclosed in violation of HIPAA’s requirements will be implemented. Technical safeguards include limiting access to information by creating computer firewalls. Physical safeguards include locking doors or filing cabinets.
    4. Privacy Notice
      The Privacy Official is responsible for developing and maintaining a notice of the Plan’s privacy practices that describes:

      • The uses and disclosures of PHI that may be made by the Plan;
      • The rights of individuals under HIPAA privacy rules;
      • The Plan’s legal duties with respect to the PHI; and
      • Other information as required by the HIPAA privacy rules.

      A privacy notice will be sent to Plan participants informing them that the District has access to PHI in connection with its plan administrative functions. The privacy notice will also imform them of the District’s complaint procedures, the name and telephone number of the contact person, and the date of the notice.
      The notice of privacy practices will be placed on the District’s website. The notice will also be individually delivered to all participants:

      • At the time of an individual’s enrollment in the Plan
      • To a person requesting the notice; and
      • Within 60 days after a material change to the notice.

      The Plan will also provide notice of availability of the privacy notice at least once every three years.

    5. Complaints
      The director of Insurance Services will be the Plan’s contact person for receiving complaints.
    6. Sanctions for Violations of Privacy Policy
      Sanctions for using or disclosing PHI in violation of this HIPAA privacy policy will be imposed in accordance with DP316B NEG: Orderly Termination Procedures—Classified, up to and including termination.
    7. Mitigation of Inadvertent Disclosures of Protected Health Information
      Any harmful effect due to an unauthorized disclosure of an individual PHI will be mitigated to the extent possible. If an employee becomes aware of a disclosure of protected health information, either by an employee of the Plan or an outside consultant/contractor that is not in compliance with this policy the Privacy Official shall be contacted so that the appropriate steps to mitigate the harm to the participant can be taken.
    8. No Intimidating or Retaliatory Acts; No Waiver of HIPAA Privacy
      No intimidation, discrimination, or other retaliatory action will be taken against an individual for exercising their right to file a complaint, participate in an investigation, or oppose any improper practice under HIPAA.
      No individual shall be required to waive his or her privacy rights under HIPAA as a condition of treatment, payment, enrollment or eligibility.
    9. Plan Document
      The Plan document shall include provisions to describe the permitted and required uses and disclosures of PHI administrative purposes.
      Specifically, the Plan document shall require the District to:

      1. Not use or further disclose PHI other than as permitted by the Plan documents or as required by law;
      2. Ensure that any agents or subcontractors to whom it provides PHI received from the Plan agree to the same restrictions and conditions that apply to the District;
      3. Not use or disclose PHI for employment-related actions;
      4. Report to the Privacy Official any use or disclosure of the information that is inconsistent with the permitted uses or disclosures;
      5. Make PHI available to Plan participants, consider their amendments and, upon request, provide them with an account of PHI disclosures;
      6. Make the District’s internal practices and records relating to the use and disclosure of PHI received from the Plan available to the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) upon request; and
      7. If feasible, return or destroy all PHI received from the Plan that the District still maintains in any form and retain no copies of such information when no longer needed for the purpose for which disclosure was made, except that, if such return or destruction is not feasible, limit further uses and disclosures to those purposes that make the return or destruction of the information infeasible.
      8. The Plan document must also require the District to (1) certify to the Privacy Official that the Plan documents have been amended to include the above restrictions and that the District agrees to those restrictions; and (2) provide adequate firewalls.
    10. Documentation
      The privacy policies and procedures shall be documented and maintained for at least six years. Policies and procedures shall be changed as necessary or appropriately to comply with changes in the law, standards, requirements and implementation specifications (including changes and modifications in regulations).
      The privacy policy shall be revised and made available if a change in law impacts the privacy notice. However, such change is effective only with respect to PHI created or received after the effective date of the notice.
      The documentation of any policies and procedures, actions, activities, and designations may be maintained in either written or electronic form. The Plan will maintain such documentation for at least six years.
  5. Policies on Use and Disclosure of PHI
    1. Use and Disclosure Defined
      The District and the Plan will use and disclose PHI only as permitted under HIPAA. The terms “use” and “disclosure” are defined as follows:

      1. Use: The sharing, employment, application, utilization, examination, or analysis of individually identifiable health information by any person working for or within the Insurance Office of the District, or by a Business Associate of the Plan.
      2. Disclosure: For information that is protected health information, disclosure means any release, transfer provision of access to, or divulging in any other manner of individually identifiable health information to persons not employed by or working with the Insurance Office of the District.
    2. Workforce Must Comply With District’s Policy and Procedures
      All employees with access to PHI must comply with this policy.
    3. Permitted Uses and Disclosures for Plan Administration Purposes
      The Plan may disclose to the District for its use the following: (1) de-indentified health information relating to plan participants; (2) Plan enrollment information; (3) summary health information for the purposes of obtaining premium bids for providing health insurance coverage under the Plan or for modifying, amending, or terminating the Plan; or (4) PHI pursuant to an authorization from the individual whose PHI is disclosed.
      The following employees have access to PHI:

      1. Director of Insurance Services who performs functions directly on behalf of the group health plan.
      2. Employees in the District Insurance Office who have access to PHI on behalf of the District for use while performing daily responsibilities
        These employees may use and disclose PHI for Plan administrative functions, and may disclose PHI to other employees with access for plan administrative functions. However, the PHI disclosed must be limited to the minimum amount necessary to perform the plan administrative function. Employees with access may not disclose PHI to other employees unless an authorization is in place or the disclosure is otherwise in compliance with this policy.
    4. Permitted Uses and Disclosures: Payment and Health Care Operations
      PHI may be disclosed to another covered entity for the payment purposes of that covered entity.

      1. Payment: Payment includes activities undertaken to obtain Plan contributions or to determine or fulfill the Plan’s responsibility for provision of benefits under the Plan, or to obtain or provide reimbursement for health care. Payment also includes:
        1. Eligibility and coverage determinations, including coordination or benefits and adjudication or subrogation of health benefit claims;
        2. Risk adjusting based on enrollee status and demographic characteristics; and
        3. Billing, claims management, collection activities, obtaining payment under a contract for reinsurance (including stop-loss insurance and excess loss insurance) and related health care data processing.
          PHI may be disclosed for purposes of the Plan’s own health care operations. PHI may be disclosed to another covered entity for purposes of the other covered entity’s quality assessment and improvement, case management, or health care fraud and abuse detection programs, if the other covered entity has (or had) a relationship with the participant and the PHI requested pertains to that relationship.
      2. Health Care Operations: Health care operations means any of the following activities to the extent that they are related to Plan administration:
        1. Conducting quality assessment and improvement activities;
        2. Reviewing health plan performance;
        3. Underwriting and premium rating;
        4. Conducting or arranging for medical review, legal services and auditing functions;
        5. Business planning and development; and
        6. Business management and general administrative activities.
    5. No Disclosure of PHI for Non-Health Plan Purposes
      PHI may not be used or disclosed for the payment or operations of the District’s “non-health” benefits (e.g., disability, workers’ compensation, life insurance, etc.), unless the participant has provided an authorization for such use or disclosure (as discussed in “Disclosures Pursuant to an Authorization”) or such use or disclosure is required by applicable state law and particular requirements under HIPAA are met.
    6. Mandatory Disclosures of PHI: to Individual and Department of Health & Human Services (DHHS)
      A particular PHI must be disclosed as required by HIPAA in the following situations:

      1. The disclosure is to the individual who is the subject of the information (see the policy for “Access to Protected Information and Request for Amendment” that follows);
      2. The disclosure is made to HHS for purposes of enforcing of HIPAA; or
      3. The disclosure is required by law.
    7. PHI may be disclosed in the following situations without a participant’s authorization, when specific requirements are satisfied:
      1. About victims of abuse, neglect or domestic violence;
      2. For judicial and administrative proceedings;
      3. For law enforcement purposes;
      4. For public health activities;
      5. For health oversight activities;
      6. For cadaveric organ, eye or tissue donation purposes;
      7. For certain limited research purposes;
      8. To avert a serious threat to health or safety;
      9. For specialized government functions;
      10. That relate to workers’ compensation programs;
      11. For treatment purposes; and
      12. About decedents.
    8. Disclosures of PHI Pursuant to an Authorization
      PHI may be disclosed for any purpose if the participant provides an authorization. All uses and disclosures made pursuant to a signed authorization must be consistent with the terms and conditions of the authorization.
    9. Complying With the “Minimum-Necessary” Standard
      When PHI is used or disclosed, the amount disclosed generally must be limited to the “minimum necessary” to accomplish the purpose of the use or disclosure.
      The “minimum necessary” standard does not apply to any of the following:

      1. Uses or disclosures made to the individual;
      2. Uses or disclosures made pursuant to a valid authorization;
      3. Disclosures made to the Department of Labor (DOL);
      4. Uses or disclosures required by law; and
      5. Uses or disclosures required to comply with HIPAA.

      All other disclosures must be reviewed on an individual basis with the Privacy Official to ensure that the amount of information disclosed is the minimum necessary to accomplish the purposes of the disclosure.

    10. Disclosures of PHI to Business Associates
      PHI may be disclosed to the Plan’s business associates and allow the Plan’s business associates to create or receive PHI on its behalf. However, prior to doing so, the Plan must first obtain assurances from the business associate that it will appropriately safeguard the information. Before sharing PHI with outside consultants or contractors who meet the definition of a “business associate,” employees must contact the Privacy Official and verify that a business associate contract is in place.
      Business Associate is an entity that:

      1. Performs or assists in performing a Plan function or activity involving the use and disclosure of protected health information, including claims processing or administration, data analysis, underwriting, etc.
      2. Provides legal, accounting, actuarial, consulting, data aggregation, management, accreditation, or financial services, where the performance of such services involves giving the service provider access to PHI.
    11. Disclosures of De-Identified Information
      The Plan may freely use and disclosure de-identified information. De-identified information is health information that does not identify an individual and with respect to which there is no reasonable basis to believe that the information can be used to identify an individual.
    12. Breach Notification Requirements
      The Plan will comply with the requirements of the HITECH Act and its implementing regulations to provide notification to affected individuals, HHS, and the media (when required) if the Plan or one of its business associates discovers a breach of unsecured PHI.
  6. Policies on Individual Rights
    1. Access to Protected Health Information and Requests for Amendment
      Participants have the right to access and obtain copies of their PHI that the Plan (or its business associates) maintains in designated record sets. Participants also may request to have their PHI amended. The Plan will provide access to PHI and will consider requests for amendment that are submitted in writing by the participants.
      “Designated Record Set” is a group of records maintained by or for the District that includes:

      1. The enrollment, payment and claim adjudication record of an individual maintained by or for the Plan; or;
      2. Other PHI used, in whole or in part, by or for the Plan to make coverage decisions about an individual.
    2. Accounting
      An individual has the right to obtain an accounting of certain disclosures of his or her own PHI. This right to an accounting extends to disclosures made in the last six years, other than disclosures for the following reasons:

      1. To carry out treatment, payment or health care operations;
      2. To individuals about their own PHI;
      3. Incident to an otherwise permitted use or disclosure;
      4. Pursuant to an authorization;
      5. For purposes of creation of a facility directory or to persons involved in the patient’s care or other notification purposes;
      6. As part of a limited data set;
      7. To correctional institutions or law enforcement when the disclosure was permitted without authorization; or
      8. For other national security or law enforcement purposes.

      The Plan shall respond to an accounting request within 60 days. If the Plan is unable to provide the accounting within 60 days, it may extend the period 30 days, provided that it gives the participant notice including the reason for the delay and the date the information will be provided.
      The accounting must include the date of the disclosure, the name of the receiving party, a brief description of the information disclosed, and a brief statement of the purpose of the disclosure, or a copy of the written request for disclosure, if any.
      The first accounting in any 12-month period shall be provided free of charge. Subsequent accountings will be charged a fee for time and material.

    3. Requests for Alternative Communication Means or Locations
      Participants may request to receive communications regarding their PHI by alternative means or at alternative locations. For example, participants may ask to be called only at work rather than at home. Such requests may be honored if, in the sole discretion of the District, the requests are reasonable. However, the District shall accommodate such a request if the participant clearly provides information that the disclosure of all or part of the information could endanger the participant.
    4. Requests for Restrictions of Uses and Disclosures of Protected Health Information
      A participant may request restrictions on the use and disclosure of her/her PHI. An attempt to honor the request will be made if the request is reasonable.

  • Effective: 6/13/2006
  • Revision: 9/8/2009
  • Reviewed: 3/26/2013

  1. Board Directive
    The Board of Education is committed to providing fitness and nutritional instruction and implementing nutritional practices that enhance student learning and support the development of lifelong wellness. Responsibility for ensuring that each school meets the provisions of this policy is delegated to the District Administration.
  2. Administrative Policy
    The Wellness policy shall be administered according to the following administrative policy provisions:

    1. Nutrition
      1. School Nutrition Programs will comply with federal, state and local requirements.
        1. Menus and options will meet the meal patterns and nutrition standards established by federal and state regulations.
        2. Lunch, ala carte, breakfast and snack programs will meet portion size and nutritional value standards.  Nutritional information on food offerings will be readily available near the point of purchase.
        3. School Nutrition Programs will be accessible to all school children. Reimbursable school meals shall not be less restrictive than regulations and guidance issued by the Secretary of Agriculture pursuant to subsections (a) and (b) of section 10 of the Child Nutrition Act (42 U.S.C. 1779) and section 9 (f)(1), 1766(a), as those regulations and guidelines apply to schools.
        4. All nutrition service personnel shall have pre-service and in-service training in nutrition and safe food service operations.
        5. The Director of Nutrition Services will ensure compliance with Section II. A. 1.
      2. School lunch periods will be scheduled to allow students adequate and appropriate time to move through lines and eat and enjoy a full lunch.
        1. Schools will examine the relationship between lunch periods, instructional periods and recess to determine the schedule most conducive to healthy eating habits.
        2. Schools will encourage a cafeteria environment that provides a positive dining experience with supervision of eating areas by adults who model proper conduct and voice level.
      3. Principals of secondary schools will monitor all foods and beverages made available in vending machines, in student stores and at concession stands and will ensure the inclusion of healthy food and beverage options for students.  All foods made available at school will adhere to food safety guidelines.  Nutrition information for all products will be made readily available near the point of purchase.
      4. With the exception of faculty vending, food and beverage vending machines will not be allowed in elementary schools.
      5. All students will receive nutrition education based upon the Utah State Healthy Lifestyles Core Curriculum.  Teachers will receive training as needed on accurate nutritional instruction.  Nutrition may be integrated into other content areas such as math, science, language arts and social studies.
      6. School administrators will encourage the use of healthy foods or non-food items as rewards for student accomplishment and for fund-raising.
      7. The local school principal will ensure compliance with Section II. A. 2-6.
    2. Physical Fitness
      1. Students will receive physical fitness instruction based upon the Utah State Healthy Lifestyles Core Curriculum.
        1. It is recommended that elementary students receive 90-120 minutes of fitness education per week.  Elementary students should also receive a daily recess period.
        2. It is recommended that secondary students participate in fitness assessment and instruction as outlined in the Core.
      2. All fitness equipment, physical activity facilities and playground equipment will be safe, properly maintained and frequently inspected.
      3. Principals are encouraged to establish or enhance fitness opportunities (such as walking clubs or fitness challenges) for staff and patrons.
      4. The local school principal will ensure compliance with Section II. B.
    3. Local School Oversight
      Each principal will annually review the school’s nutrition and fitness efforts with the School Community Council.  A report of this review will be submitted to the appropriate Administrator of Schools.
    4. District Nutrition and Fitness Advisory Committee
      1. The District shall establish a Nutrition and Wellness Advisory Committee. The committee shall be organized for the purpose of reviewing wellness efforts, research, and best practices and advising the Board of Education on fitness and nutrition issues.
      2. Committee membership shall include three principals, the Director of Nutrition Services, three teachers, one school nurse, and six patrons.  The District Healthy Lifestyles Consultant will chair the committee.
      3. The committee will meet at least twice a year.

  • Effective: 1/9/1996
  • Revision: 5/26/2015
  • Reviewed: 4/26/13

  1. Board Directive
    It is the policy of the Board to authorize paid sick leave benefits for licensed personnel who work 20 hours per week or more and to comply with requirements of Public Law 103-3, Family and Medical Leave Act.  The Board delegates to the Administration responsibility for establishing guidelines for sick leave and family leave benefits.  Sick leave runs concurrent with Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) and Workers Compensation.  Refer to Policy DP322 NEG- Family Medical Leave Act.
  2. Administrative Policy
    Definitions
    Immediate family is defined as husband, wife, daughter, son, father, mother, brother, sister, or other person residing in the employee’s home on a permanent basis. Special circumstances may be appealed to the Sick Leave Review Committee for consideration of immediate family status.
    Continuous service includes an approval leave of absence, sabbatical leave, sick bank, military and/or FMLA leave.  A resignation or retirement constitutes a “break in service.”  Employees returning to Jordan School District following a break in service will receive a new continuous service date reflecting the date of their return.  District seniority will be based on the new continuous service date.  Prior employment experience with Jordan School District may be taken into consideration for purposes of placement on the salary schedule.
    The sick leave policy shall be administered according to the following administrative policy provisions:

    1. Sick Leave Allowances
      1. Until June 30, 2007, licensed employees with a continuous service date prior to July 1, 1977, shall be allowed unlimited sick leave not to exceed 180 days per contract year for 9-month employees, 220 days for 11-month employees, and 240 days for 12-month employees.
      2. Licensed employees with a continuous service date on or after July 1, 1977, shall be allowed sick leave in accordance with the following schedule:
        Year 1 (not eligible for sick bank) 10 days per year*
        Years 2 through 5 10 days per year*
        Years 6 through 10 11 days per year*
        Years 11 through 15 12 days per year*
        Years 16 and beyond 13 days per year*
        Maximum accumulations:
        176 and 184-day contracts (9 month) 180 days
        220 to 233-day contracts (11 month) 220 days
        245-day contracts (12 month) 240 days

        * Note: An employee may use up to three days of his/her own accumulated sick leave to attend to the health care needs of immediate family members.  This schedule does not change the way unused sick leave benefits are calculated at the time of retirement.

      3. Employee Eligibility
        1. In order to be eligible to participate in the sick bank an employee must voluntarily donate one day annually of accumulated sick leave to the sick bank.  Employees wishing to opt out of participation in the sick bank must annually complete the appropriate form no later than September 1 of each school year.  Employees who have been offered a temporary transitional duty assignment due to a work-related injury, who refuse the temporary transitional duty assignment, will not be eligible for Sick Bank.
        2. First-year employees are not eligible to participate in the sick bank.
      4. Calculating sick leave allowances
        1. Employees hired after a contract year has started shall receive sick leave benefits on a prorated basis for the remainder of that year.  (For example, an employee who is on contract for 50 percent of the contract year would be eligible to receive 50 percent or 5 days of the 10-day annual sick leave allowance.)
        2. When calculating sick leave allowances in subsequent years, employees shall be awarded a full year of service for the first partial year of employment if their hire date is prior to January 1.  If their hire date is after January 1, no service shall be awarded for the first partial year of employment.
      5. Sick leave benefits during approved absences
        1. Interruptions of work for sabbatical leave, educational leave, or other authorized leaves shall not be considered a break in continuous service.  Should an employee be granted a leave for any reason, he/she will keep his/her number of cumulative sick leave days to be used upon return, but shall not be considered for sick leave during the time of leave.
        2. Employees returning from authorized leaves shall receive sick leave benefits according to the policy in force at the time the leave began except when the policy is changed as a result of negotiations.
      6. Use of sick leave for critical family care
        A maximum of twelve (12) days of sick leave may be used each year to care for a critically ill member of the immediate family or critically ill person residing on a permanent basis in the employee's home.

        1. Use of sick leave for critical family illness must be authorized by the Sick Leave Bank Review Committee.  The employee must submit his/her request in writing by applying online via Employee Access.
        2. Employees may not apply for critical family illness benefits until two (2) personal leave days and all family leave benefits are used.  Employees will be allowed to use up to five (5) personal leave days, but may not use more than five (5) accumulated personal leave days in any contract year as set forth in DP335 Personal Leave—Licensed.
        3. In cases of extended critical illness, employees may apply for additional days beyond the twelve (12) day allowance.
          1. If circumstances warrant it, the Sick Leave Bank Review Committee may authorize additional days equal to the number of unused family days available at the beginning of the critical illness. (A maximum of 3.)
          2. Employees who have exhausted two personal leave days, and family leave benefits, but who must continue to deal with a critical family care (as defined in item 5 above) may apply to the Sick Leave Bank Review Committee for additional days.  One additional day may be granted for each year of service in the District up to a maximum of fifteen (15) days.  If additional days are granted, only the cost of a long-term substitute shall be deducted from the educator’s pay.
          3. For those employees hired prior to July 1, 1977, the Sick Leave Bank Review Committee may allow the use of sick leave days for a critical family care (as defined in item 5 above).  One additional day may be granted for each year of service in the District up to a maximum of 12 days.  If additional days are granted, only the cost of a long-term substitute will be deducted from the educator’s pay. This will remain in effect until June 30, 2007.
      7. Use of sick leave for adoption
        1. An employee who adopts a child must apply for critical family care days by submitting his/her request in writing to the Sick Leave Bank Review Committee by applying online via employee access.   Employees may use up to a maximum of twenty (20) days critical family leave at the time of actual custody of the child.
        2. Employees may not apply for critical family care benefits until two personal leave days and family leave benefits are used.  Employees will be allowed to use up to five (5) personal leave days, but may not use more than five (5) accumulated personal leave days in any contract year as set forth in DP335- Personal Leave—Licensed.
        3. Any additional leave must fall under the policy provisions of DP322—Family Medical Leave Act.
        4. Part-time employees (half-time or more) may be granted up to a total of twelve (12) weeks leave (paid and non paid, including any off track time to continue to care for an adopted infant.
          (1) During the leave period, the District shall continue to pay its portion of the employee’s group health insurance premium.  An employee on leave must continue to pay his/her portion of the health insurance premium in order to keep coverage in effect.
          (2) An employee is not entitled to the accrual of any seniority or employment benefits that would have accrued if not for the leave.  An employee will not lose any seniority or employment benefits that accrued before the date the leave began.
          (3) If an employee fails to return to work after the leave has ended, the District may recover the health insurance premium paid by the District on the employee’s behalf.
    2. Employee-Funded Sick Leave Bank
      1. Establishment of the sick leave bank
        1. Each year, all participating employees (years 2 and beyond) in the accumulated sick leave program will donate one (1) sick leave day, unless the employee has opted out, to be placed in the sick bank.
      2. Use of the sick leave bank
        1. The sick bank is not intended to be used for short-term, in-and-out absences, elective medical procedures or other medical care that could be scheduled during non-contract time.
        2. Medically documented intermittent leave for long-term illness may be approved.
        3. Days from the sick leave bank shall be granted to eligible employees only after all accrued sick leave, family leave, and personal leave days have been used.
        4. Employees will be required to sign a release of medical information when making application to the sick leave bank.  Sick leave bank members must sign a confidentiality agreement to protect employees’ medical information and confidentiality.
        5. A combination of continuous years of service and accumulated sick leave days shall be used to determine the number of sick bank days which an employee qualifies to receive and any pay loss to be sustained.  (Years of service shall be computed in accordance with established guidelines for salary step movement.)
        6. Employees are not eligible to participate in the sick bank until 12 months after the date of employment.
        7. Employees who have been offered a temporary transitional duty assignment due to a work related injury, who refuse the temporary transitional duty assignment, will not be eligible for Sick Bank.
    3. Sick Bank Allowances
      1. Second Year Employees
        1. Second year employees shall be allowed up to 10 sick bank days at full pay according to the following schedule:
          Days of Accumulated
          Number of Days that
          Sick Bank
          Sick Leave at Beginning
          Long-Term Substitute
          Days Allowed
          of Long-Term Absence
          Costs Will Be Deducted
          At Full Pay
          13 plus
          0
          10
          12
          1
          9
          11
          2
          8
          10
          3
          7
          9
          4
          6
          8
          5
          5
          7
          6
          4
          6
          7
          3
          5
          8
          2
          4
          9
          1
          3 or fewer
          10
          0
        2. After all sick bank days allowed according to the schedule listed under item a. are used, second year employees may be granted up to 10 additional sick bank days if circumstances warrant it.  The cost of a long-term substitute shall be deducted for each additional day used under this option.
        3. In cases of catastrophic illness or injury, the Sick Bank Committee may grant second year employees up to 20 additional days of sick bank after all sick bank days provided under items a. and b. are exhausted.  The cost of a long-term substitute shall be deducted for each additional day used under this option.
      2. Third Year Employees
        1. Third year employees shall be allowed up to 40 sick bank days at full pay according to the following schedule:
          Days of Accumulated
          Number of Days that
          Sick Bank
          Sick Leave at Beginning
          Long-Term Substitute
          Days Allowed
          of Long-Term Absence
          Costs Will Be Deducted
          At Full Pay
          15 plus
          0
          40
          14
          1
          39
          13
          2
          38
          12
          3
          37
          11
          4
          36
          10
          5
          35
          9
          6
          34
          8
          7
          33
          7
          8
          32
          6
          9
          31
          5
          10
          30
          4
          11
          29
          3
          12
          28
          2
          13
          27
          1
          14
          26
          0
          15
          25
        2. After all sick bank days allowed according to the schedule listed under item a. are used, third year employees may be granted up to 40 additional sick bank days if circumstances warrant it.  The cost of a long-term substitute shall be deducted for each additional day used under this option.
        3. In cases of catastrophic illness or injury, the Sick Bank Committee may grant third year employees sufficient sick bank days to cover their transition to long-term disability after all of the sick bank days provided under items a. and b. are exhausted.  The cost of a long-term substitute shall be deducted for each additional day used under this option.
      3. Employees with four or more years of service shall be allowed up to 120 days from the sick bank at full pay less the cost of the substitute for each day the employee falls below 15 days of accumulated sick leave at the beginning of the long-term absence.  (A maximum of 15 days' long-term substitute costs will be deducted.)
      4. Sick bank limitations
        1. Prior to granting sick bank days, an employee shall agree in writing to repay compensation at his/her daily rate of pay for sick bank days used or granted if he/she terminates employment with the district for other than medical reasons before completion of the current and succeeding contract year.
        2. The illness/injury must be medically documented with a statement bearing an original signature from the attending physician.  The verification of absence form may not be stamped with a physician's signature or signed by the attending nurse, office manager, etc.
        3. A second opinion may be required with any costs not covered by insurance borne by the District.
        4. When an employee requests sick bank days more than once within a 48-month period for an unrelated illness, a three (3)-day loss of pay shall be required before sick bank days are granted.  Use of sick bank days shall be limited to 120 days within a 48-month period.  The employee will also be required to meet all other qualifying criteria.
        5. Under catastrophic conditions, employees may appeal to the sick bank committee for a waiver of pay loss provisions.  The committee shall review the employee's attendance record and other related factors and either grant or deny the waiver based on the findings.  No appeal beyond the sick bank committee is provided.
    4. Sick Leave Review Board
      1. A Sick Leave Review Board shall be organized to review issues related to sick bank usage and cases of suspected sick leave abuse.
      2. The Sick Leave Review Board shall be composed of one administrator appointed by the superintendent and two members appointed by the president of the licensed employee agent.
    5. Abuse of Sick Leave
      1. Administrators shall periodically review sick leave usage.
      2. If an abuse of sick leave is suspected, the administrator shall confer with the employee and, if necessary, ask the Sick Leave Review Board to review the case.  Cases will be reviewed according to Administrative Guidelines developed by the Sick Leave Review Board.
      3. If it is determined that an abuse of sick leave has occurred, the following actions shall be taken:
        1. The sick leave benefits which were paid inappropriately shall be reclaimed from the employee.
        2. The employee shall be suspended for five (5) days without pay during the next pay period.
        3. A reprimand shall be entered in the employee's personnel file.
      4. A second proven abuse of sick leave may result in immediate termination.
    6. Payment for Sick Leave
      1. In order to receive full pay for work missed due to illness or injury, employees shall complete an absence form which is approved by the immediate supervisor and submitted to the Payroll Department for processing.
      2. Employees may be required to verify the nature and duration of an illness or injury with a doctor's certificate.
    7. Notification of Absence
      1. Employees are required to notify their immediate supervisor as soon as they know that they will be absent from work.
      2. If a substitute must be hired, the employee shall see that the Human Resources Department is notified no later than 6:30 a.m. on the day of the absence.

Effective: 6/27/1995

  • Revision: 9/8/2009
  • Reviewed: 12/10/2013

  1. Board Directive
    The Board recognizes that students with special health care needs are entitled to public education.  Therefore, the Board delegates to the Administration responsibility for developing policy to provide necessary health care services for students with special health care needs in accordance with state and federal law.  (See Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Utah Nurse Practice Act, the Nurse Practice Act Rules, and Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 1990.)
  2. Administrative Policy
    The Administration may provide accommodations to students with special health care needs who require individualized health-related services/interventions by Jordan School District and its personnel to enable their participation in the educational process.  This policy shall be administered within health and safety parameters according to the following administrative policy provisions:

    1. Definition of Special Health Care Needs
      Students shall be considered as having a special health care need if one or more of the following conditions applies:

      1. The student requires administration of medication during the school day in order to access his/her educational program.  (Note:  If the student's only special health care need is administration of medication during the school day, the student's services shall be administered according to Policy AS85—Medication in the School Setting and the provisions of this policy shall not apply.)
      2. The student requires administration of support procedures during the school day in order to access his/her educational program.
      3. The student uses a particular health care device that monitors or compensates for the loss of a body function.
      4. The student's health condition may require routine or emergency health care procedures.
      5. The student's health condition may require substantial, complex, or frequent health care services to avert death or further disability.
      6. The student's individual education program requires support health care services.
    2. Requesting Special Health Care Services/Interventions
      Procedures for requesting special health care services/interventions are as follows:

      1. The student's parent formally requests special health care services/interventions by completing the “Jordan School District Request for Special Health Care Services and Release of Confidential Information” form available online, or from the school principal.  This form must be submitted each year.
      2. The student's parent shall provide all of the forms and information necessary to enable the District nurse to make an initial assessment of the student's condition.  This may include:
        1. A statement from the student's primary health care provider which describes the special services/interventions required and how they are to be administered.
        2. Other health-related evaluations or information as requested by the District nurse.
      3. Except for students subject to IDEA or §504 of the Rehabilitation Act, expenses for health-related evaluations and assessments shall be the responsibility of the parent.  Parents who need financial assistance obtaining required health-related evaluations or information shall be advised to contact the Utah State Department of Health.
      4. The principal shall provide liaison services and facilitate communication with the parents, school nurse, primary health care provider, school staff, and other agencies as necessary.
    3. Responding to Requests for Services/Interventions
      The process for reviewing and approving or denying requests for special health care services/interventions shall be as follows:

      1. The school principal shall forward the “Jordan School District Request For Special Health Care Services and Release of Confidential Information” form to the school nurse for an initial health care assessment.
      2. The District nurse shall review the “Jordan School District Request for Special Health Care Services and Release of Confidential Information” form and all accompanying documents and evalua­tions to determine the following:
        1. What health care services/interventions are required; e.g., medications, special diet, school or classroom modifications, equipment, supplies, etc.
        2. Whether the requested services/interventions are necessary during the school day to enable the student to access his/her educational program.
        3. Whether the requested services/interventions can reasonably be accommodated by school personnel.
        4. Whether the requested services/interventions can legally be provided by school personnel who are not licensed nurses or health care practitioners.  (Note: Nursing activities not specifically addressed in the Utah Nurse Practices Act may be performed by a non-licensed individual provided the activity does not require exercising nursing judgment and the activity is delegated and supervised by a licensed nurse.)
        5. Whether the requested services/interventions constitute supportive rather than medical services.
      3. The District nurse shall report the findings of the initial health care assessment to the school principal with a recommendation to grant or deny the request for special services/interventions.
      4. The District nurse may organize a Health Care Team to develop an individual health care plan for the student if needed.
      5. The principal shall forward the request to the District Compliance Officer if any of the following conditions apply:
        1. The requested services are “medical” (services that can only be rendered by a physician) rather than “support” services.
        2. The requested special services/interventions cannot be provided by school personnel in accordance with the Utah Nurse Practice Act.
        3. The request for services is denied by the District nurse.
    4. District Review and Right of Appeal
      1. The District Compliance Officer shall notify the parents and District nurse in writing if the request for special services/interventions is denied.
      2. The parents shall be informed in writing that decisions of the District Compliance Officer may be appealed to a Health Services Panel composed of the Coordinator of Educational Support Services, the appropriate Administrator of Schools, and a designated District nurse.  Appeal procedures are as follows:
        1. A written appeal shall be submitted to the Superintendent of Schools within 10 days of the determination of the District Compliance Officer.
        2. The Health Services Panel shall review the findings of the District Compliance Officer and make a determination about the school's ability to provide the special health care services requested.
        3. Parents shall be notified of the Health Services Panel's decision in writing.
    5. Individualized Health Care Plans
      1. An individualized Health Care Plan shall be developed by the District nurse for all students who qualify for special health care services/interventions.
      2. Plans shall be developed prior to placement if the student's condition is life threatening or capable of causing serious injury to the student or to other students or staff members. Until a health care plan can be developed, the student may be placed in the Home and Hospital or other appropriate instruction program.  However, if the student is designated under either §504 of the Vocational Rehabilitation Act or receives education pursuant to an individualized education program, then the IEP team must be convened prior to any change in placement to address the health needs for school.
      3. Each individualized health care plan may include the following components:
        1. A description of the student's health condition.
        2. A description of the services/interventions to be performed with specific, detailed instructions from the student's health care provider.
        3. Written permission from the parents to administer any required medications or perform any required procedures.
        4. A list of the school personnel assigned by the school principal to perform the services/interventions.  If the parent, privately employed nurse, or other non-employee is to perform the service, parent must provide prior written permission.
        5. A description of any recommended safety precautions and/or signs of distress which could indicate the onset of a medical emergency.
        6. Instructions for emergency interventions including:
          1. Emergency numbers for family and alternative contacts.
          2. The preferred emergency room if requested by primary medical provider or parent.
          3. A list of school personnel who are acquainted with the student's condition and able to render emergency assistance.
          4. Evacuation procedures.
          5. Other information the District nurse deems necessary.
        7. Instructions for special transportation services, if applicable, including:
          1. The mode of transportation to and from school.
          2. The maximum recommended travel time each way.
          3. Equipment and adaptations necessary for transportation; e.g., lifts, wheelchair restraints, oxygen, etc.
          4. Special staffing or training required for transportation personnel.
        8. An implementation date.
      1. The completed individualized health care plan shall be maintained by the school as a "private" record in accordance with the Government Records Access Management Act.  Eligible students under IDEA or Section 504 must have health care plans attached to their IEP or 504 plan.
      2. Parents shall notify the principal in writing of any changes in the student's condition which may require a modification of the health care plan.  The health care team shall be reconvened, if necessary. The principal shall notify the District nurse of any changes in the student’s condition.
    6. Staff Assignments
      1. The school principal, in conjunction with the District nurse, shall assign staff members to perform special health care services/interventions outlined in the Individualized Health Care Plan.  Such assignments shall be within the limits of Policy AS85—Medication in the School Setting by school personnel, and the Utah Nurse Practices Act and other applicable statutes and regulations.
      2. The school principal shall see that staff members assigned to provide special health care services/interventions for students understand and use Universal Precautions Against Blood Borne Diseases.
      3. The school principal and District nurse shall cooperatively determine the in-service training necessary to enable the assigned staff members to successfully perform the required services/interventions.
      4. Following in-service training and prior to rendering special health care service/interventions, the District nurse shall verify the staff member's ability to safely perform the assigned duties.
      5. The District nurse shall advise the school principal regarding supervision of staff members assigned to perform special health care service/interventions.
      6. The school principal may notify other staff members of the student's need for special health care services/interventions within the limits of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) and the Government Records Management Access Act (GRAMA) and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPPA).
      7. The school principal shall notify the District nurse and staff members assigned to provide special services/interventions of any changes in the student's condition that have necessitated changes in the Individualized Health Care Plan.
    7. Provisions for Health and Safety
      1. The school principal shall be responsible to see that all staff members receive training in the use of Universal Precautions Against Blood Borne Diseases.
      2. The school principal shall be responsible to see that the necessary equipment, materials and supplies are provided to staff members who are required to perform special health care services/interventions.
      3. Universal Precautions Against Blood Borne Diseases shall be used in handling and disposing hazardous materials.
      4. Upon the recommendation of the State Health Department or recommendation of a personal physician based on a staff member's special medical condition, the District shall pay for immunizations and/or related testing for staff members whose assignment to provide special health care services/interventions places them at increased health risk.
      5. Staff members shall not be required to perform special health care services or interventions if so doing places them in imminent danger or exposes them to serious health risk.
      6. If the safeguards outlined in this policy are not implemented, staff members may refuse to perform special health care services/interventions and shall appeal to the District Compliance Officer in accordance with the procedures outlined in Policy DP315 NEG—Grievance Procedures.

  • Effective: 5/23/1989
  • Revision: 12/8/2015
  • Reviewed: 8/25/2015

  1. Board Directive
    Jordan School District has a responsibility to maintain public trust and confidence by providing a safe environment for students, employees, volunteers and patrons.  The District also has a responsibility to assure, so far as reasonably possible, that all employees are able to assume their duties and carry out the tasks for which they were hired.  Consequently, since abuse of drugs and alcohol in the work place decreases employee safety and productivity, adherence to this Substance Abuse-Free Work Environment Policy is a condition of employment for all Jordan District employees.  Adherence is vital for all employees.  This policy is written to comply with all requirements found in state and federal law, including: 41 USC 81 et seq., the Federal Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988;Utah Code §34-41-101 et seq.; Utah Code §26-38 et seq.; Utah Code §53A-3-501 et seq.; Utah Code §58-37-8 et seq.; Utah Code §58-37a-5 et seq.; Utah Code §53-10-211 et seq.; Utah Administrative Code R477-14; Utah Administrative Code R392-510; and Utah State Office of Education, Pupil Transportation Drug and Alcohol Testing Policy.
    The Board delegates to the Administration the responsibility for establishing policy that promotes a substance abuse-free work environment and developing procedures for dealing with policy violations.  Compliance with this policy is mandatory consistent with federal and state law.
  2. Administrative Policy
    The Administration is committed to establishing and maintaining a substance abuse-free work environment.  Therefore, District employees and volunteers are prohibited from the following while on District property, while operating a District vehicle or while attending any school-sponsored activity or event:

    • Manufacturing, dispensing, possessing, distributing, consuming, using or being under the influence of or using any unlawful controlled substance, drug paraphernalia or alcohol.
    • Manufacturing, dispensing, distributing, consuming or using an electronic cigarette or tobacco in any form.

    Any employee or volunteer found in violation may be subject to possible legal actions and/or disciplinary actions including but not limited to probation, suspension, and/or termination of employment or removal as a volunteer.  Administrative policy provisions and due process procedures for employees who violate the substance Abuse-Free Work Environment are outlined in District policies, including DP374 – Employment Background Checks; DP316 NEG—Orderly Termination Procedure; Licensed; DP316A—Orderly Termination Procedures – Administrators; and DP316B—Orderly Termination Procedures - Classified.

    1. Definitions
      1. Safety Sensitive Positions:  Positions which directly affect the safety of District employees and/or the general public during the course of performing job duties (i.e. District vehicle driving, etc.).
      2. Random Testing:  Testing of employees in safety sensitive positions as part of a District random drug testing program.
      3. Reasonable suspicion:  An articulated belief based on the recorded specific facts and reasonable inferences drawn from those facts that an employee is in violation of the drug-free workplace policy.
      4. Rehabilitative Testing:  Unannounced testing of preselected employees done as part of a program of counseling, education, and treatment of an employee in conjunction with the District’s Drug and Alcohol policy.
      5. Medical Review Officer (MRO):  A trained practitioner at the testing facility authorized to administer and interpret controlled substance and alcohol tests.
      6. Drug testing:  The scientific analysis for the presence of drugs or their metabolites in the human body in accordance with the definitions and terms of Utah Code §34-41-101 et seq.
      7. Sample:  Means urine or breath sample.
      8. Electronic Cigarette: Any electronic oral device that provides a vapor of nicotine or other substance and which simulates smoking through its use or through inhalation of the vapor through the device; and includes an oral device that is composed of a heating element, battery, or electronic circuit and marketed, manufactured, distributed, or sold as an e-cigarette, vapor sticks, e-pipe, or any other product name or descriptor, if the function of the product meets the definition of an electronic oral device.
    2. Procedures for Implementation
      1. Training:  All employees are expected to receive training regarding this policy during the Onboarding process and through the critical policy review process at the start of each school year.
      2. Types of Testing:  Testing may be administered under the following conditions:
        1. Pre-employment testing for controlled substances for school bus drivers and employees in other safety sensitive positions.
        2. Random testing for controlled substances and alcohol for employees in safety sensitive positions.
        3. Reasonable suspicion testing for controlled substances and alcohol for all District employees.  This may include, but is not limited to, any one or more of the following:
          1. Observable symptoms of use or of being under the influence of alcohol or drugs.
          2. Presence of drug or alcohol paraphernalia.
          3. Any involvement (even indirectly) in an accident or near-miss that resulted or may have resulted in an employee injury or property damage or loss.
          4. Reports of drug or alcohol possession, use and/or distribution.
          5. Unexplained or suspicious absenteeism or tardiness.
          6. Unexplained significant deterioration in employee performance or behavior.
          7. Criminal citations, arrests or convictions as outlined in District Policy DP374 – Employment Background Checks.
          8. Any behavior or statements that would suggest that drugs or alcohol are present in the body.
        4. Post-accident or critical incident investigation testing for controlled substances and alcohol for all employees.
        5. Rehabilitative testing for controlled substances and alcohol for all District employees.
        6. Prior to return to duty or as a condition of continued employment if alcohol or controlled substances is the reason for a District employee’s absence from duty.
        7.  As a follow up in combination with a mutually agreed upon rehabilitation program.
      3. Testing:  Drug and alcohol testing shall be conducted in accordance with Utah Code §34-41-104 by an independent laboratory certified for employment drug and alcohol testing.
        1. Drug and alcohol testing results shall be confirmed using reliable testing methods and communicated to both the Human Resources department and the current or prospective employee by the MRO.
        2. Current or prospective employees shall be informed of their option for a split urine sample test at the employee’s shared expense in accordance with Utah Code §34-41-103 and Utah Code §34-41-104.
      4. Testing Required:  Employees required to participate in testing will make themselves available for testing as soon as notified by their supervisor.  Employees who refuse to submit for a test under this policy will be subject to employment discipline including termination.
      5. Sample Collection:
        1. The collection of samples shall be performed under reasonable and sanitary conditions and in a manner reasonably calculated to prevent substitutions or interference with the collection or testing of the sample.
        2. Reasonable measures will be taken to ensure the privacy of the individual being tested during sample collection.
        3. Samples collected shall be labeled and sealed to reasonably preclude the probability of erroneous identification of test results.
        4. The individual being tested shall have the opportunity to provide notification of any information relevant to the test, such as prescription and non-prescription medications used.  The individual may also provide information in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990.
        5. Sample collection, storage and transportation to the testing facility shall be performed in a manner that reasonably precludes the probability of sample misidentification, contamination, or adulteration.
        6. Sample testing conforms to scientifically accepted analytical methods and procedures.
      6. Results:  The drug testing facility shall communicate all drug test results to Human Resources.
        1. Positive results:  The MRO will determine whether there is a legitimate medical explanation for the result.  If no legitimate medical explanation exists, the MRO will inform Human Resources and the sample donor of the positive results.  Human Resources will remove the employee from duty and inform the employee of the option to have a split urine sample tested at a shared expense as provided for by Utah Code §34-41-103 and Utah Code §34-41-104.  Human Resources will then initiate disciplinary action.  At any disciplinary hearing, in addition to considering the initial test results, the test results of the any split urine sample shall be considered.
    3.  Violations
      1. Convictions or Arrests
        1. Employees arrested or convicted for a substance abuse-related activity are required to report the arrest or conviction to the Administrator of Human Resources within forty-eight (48) hours or the next business day, whichever is greater, as outlined in District Policy DP374 – Employment Background Checks.
        2. The District will follow established reporting guidelines when notifying the Utah State Office of Education.
        3. Any arrest or conviction for substance abuse-related activity or failure to report an arrest or conviction will result in disciplinary action as outlined in District Policy DP374 – Employment Background Checks.
        4. The District will provide adequate due process for the employee as outlined in District policies DP316 NEG—Orderly Termination Procedures – Licensed; DP316A—Orderly Termination Procedures – Administrators; and DP316B—Orderly Termination Procedures - Classified.
    4. Discipline
      In the event an employee tests positive for unlawful controlled substances; tests positive for alcohol; refuses to submit to a drug or alcohol test; attempts to taint, avoid, delay or circumvent the testing process; is arrested (charged or convicted) on a alcohol or drug-related offense; or violates this policy in some other way, the District will initiate appropriate administrative and criminal investigations, and a confirmed violation of this policy may result in discipline up to and including termination of employment.
    5. Employee Assistance
      1. An employee who feels he/she may have alcohol and/or drug dependency problem is encouraged to contact the District Employee Assistance Program (EAP).  Employees are responsible to seek assistance for substance abuse problems before policy infractions occur and disciplinary action is necessary.
      2. The District will provide an EAP at no cost designed to provide professional and confidential assistance to employees.
      3. Employees are encouraged to seek short-term help from the Jordan Family Education Center at no cost.
      4. The District will provide a reasonable accommodation to seek treatment for employees who voluntarily report dependency problems.  Employees needing extensive help from a licensed treatment facility (in-patient or out-patient) will incur all associated treatment costs.
      5. Once the substance abuse policy is violated, subsequent enrollment in a treatment program will not necessarily lessen disciplinary action and may have no bearing on the determination of appropriate disciplinary action.

  • Effective: 7/8/1986
  • Revision: 10/25/2016

  1. Board Directive
    The Board recognizes that the possession, use, or distribution of illegal drugs, alcoholic beverages, or other prohibited substances constitutes a hazard to students and is disruptive to the educational process.  The Board mandates, consistent with federal and state law, the development and implementation of programs that: 1) provide information about the harmful effects of drug and alcohol use, 2) coordinate efforts by schools and parents or guardians in preventing drug and alcohol use, and 3) assist parents or guardians of students who use drugs or alcohol in seeking professional help from public and private educational and rehabilitative agencies.The Board delegates to the Administration, responsibility for providing:  1) drug and alcohol use prevention programs, 2) disciplinary procedures and consequences for students who possess, use, or distribute illegal drugs, alcoholic beverages, or prohibited substances on school district property, during school hours, or at school functions, and 3) support for students and families in drug and alcohol use identification and prevention efforts.
  2. Administrative Policy
    The Administration recognizes the need to prevent the possession, use, and distribution of any substance listed in this policy on school district property, during school hours, and at any school-sponsored extra-curricular program or activity, including those held off school property.

    1. Alcohol Violations
      Definition: Alcoholic beverages or products as defined in Utah Code §32B-1-1-102

      1. Possessing (personal or property), using (consuming, inhaling, or injecting), or being under the influence of alcoholic beverages.
        1. First Violation
          A student possessing, using, or under the influence of alcohol for the first time will be suspended from school pending a meeting with the school administrator and parent(s) or guardian(s).  At the meeting the student and parent(s) or guardian(s) will be given a choice between the following two disciplinary consequences:

          1. The student will be placed in a home-based alternative education program for ten (10) school days.  Parent(s) or guardian(s) will be required to coordinate homework assignments with a designated school representative.
          2. The student and his/her parent(s) or guardian(s) will enroll in a Jordan District First Offender Drug and Alcohol Class.  The student will be able to return to school after attending the first session of the class.  Parent(s) or guardian(s) will be required to coordinate homework assignments with a designated school representative during the intervening time.  If the requirements of the class are not met, the student will automatically be placed in a home-based alternative education program for ten (10) school days less the number of school days missed during the intervening time between the violation and the first class session.
        2. Second Violation
          A student possessing, using, or under the influence of alcohol for the second time will be suspended from school pending a meeting with the school administrator and parent(s) or guardian(s).  At the meeting, the student will be placed in a home-based alternative education program for forty-five (45) school days.  In addition, the student who has a second violation must submit to a written assessment for potential substance dependence.  A confirmation of the assessment must be received by the administrator of the District’s Programs for At-Risk Students before the student is readmitted to school.
        3. Third Violation
          A student possessing, using, or under the influence of alcohol for the third time will be suspended from school pending a meeting with the school administrator and parent(s) or guardian(s).  At the meeting, the student will be placed in a home-based alternative education program for one-hundred eighty (180) school days.  In addition, the student who has a third violation must submit to a written assessment for potential substance dependence.  A confirmation of the assessment must be received by the administrator of the District’s Programs for At-Risk Students before the student is readmitted to school.
      2. Distributing (Selling, Sharing, or Delivering)
        1. First Violation
          A student distributing alcohol for the first time will be suspended from school pending a meeting with the school administrator and parent(s) or guardian(s).  At the meeting, the student will be placed in a home-based alternative education program for forty-five (45) school days.  In addition, the student who has a distribution violation must submit to a written assessment for potential substance dependence.  A confirmation of the assessment must be received by the administrator of the District’s Programs for At-Risk Students before the student is readmitted to school.
        2. Second Violation
          A student possessing, using, or distributing alcohol following a first distribution violation will be suspended from school pending a meeting with the school administrator and parent(s) or guardian(s).  At the meeting, the student will be placed in a home-based alternative education program for one-hundred eighty (180) school days.  In addition, the student who has a second violation must submit to a written assessment for potential substance dependence.  A confirmation of the assessment must be received by the administrator of the District’s Programs for At-Risk Students before the student is readmitted to school.
    2. Illegal Substance Violations
      Definition: Any substance defined as illegal in Utah Code §76-10-1-107 or §58-37-1 et seq. (e.g.   marijuana, narcotics, opiates, psychotoxic drugs)

      1. Possessing (personal or property), using (consuming, inhaling, or injecting), or being under the influence of illegal substances
        1. First Violation
          A student possessing, using, or under the influence of illegal substances for the first time will be suspended from school pending a meeting with the school administrator and parent(s) or guardian(s).  At the meeting the student and parent(s) or guardian(s) will be given a choice between the following two disciplinary consequences:

          1. The student will be placed in a home-based alternative education program for ten (10) school days.  Parent(s) or guardian(s) will be required to coordinate homework assignments with a designated school representative.
          2. The student and his/her parent(s) or guardian(s) will enroll in a Jordan District First Offender Drug and Alcohol Class.  The student will be able to return to school after attending the first session of the class.  Parent(s) or guardian(s) will be required to coordinate homework assignments with a designated school representative during the intervening time.  If the requirements of the class are not met, the student will automatically be placed in a home-based alternative education program for ten (10) school days less the number of school days missed during the intervening time between the violation and the first class session.
        2. Second Violation
          A student possessing, using, or under the influence of illegal substances for the second time will be suspended from school pending a meeting with the school administrator and parent(s) or guardian(s).  At the meeting, the student will be placed in a home-based alternative education program for forty-five (45) school days.  In addition, the student who has a second violation must submit to a written assessment for potential substance dependence.  A confirmation of the assessment must be received by the administrator of the District’s Programs for At-Risk Students before the student is readmitted to school.
        3. Third Violation
          A student possessing, using, or under the influence of illegal substances for the third time will be suspended from school pending a meeting with the school administrator and parent(s) or guardian(s).  At the meeting, the student will be placed in a home-based alternative education program for one-hundred eighty (180) school days.  In addition, the student who has a third violation must submit to a written assessment for potential substance dependence.  A confirmation of the assessment must be received by the administrator of the District’s Programs for At-Risk Students before the student is readmitted to school.
      2. Distributing (Selling, Sharing, or Delivering)
        1. First Violation
          A student distributing illegal substances for the first time will be suspended from school pending a meeting with the school administrator and parent(s) or guardian(s).  At the meeting, the student will be placed in a home-based alternative education program for forty-five (45) school days.  In addition, the student who has a distribution violation must submit to a written assessment for potential substance dependence.  A confirmation of the assessment must be received by the administrator of the District’s Programs for At-Risk Students before the student is readmitted to school.
        2. Second Violation
          A student possessing, using, or distributing illegal substances following a first distribution violation will be suspended from school pending a meeting with the school administrator and parent(s) or guardian(s).  At the meeting, the student will be placed in a home-based alternative education program for one-hundred eighty (180) school days.  In addition, the student who has a second violation must submit to a written assessment for potential substance dependence.  A confirmation of the assessment must be received by the administrator of the District’s Programs for At-Risk Students before the student is readmitted to school.
    3. Counterfeit Substances Violations
      Definition:  Any substance that is falsely represented to be any legally or illegally manufactured controlled substance that a reasonable person would believe to be a legal or illegal controlled substance. This is to include but not limited to the drugs listed on the DEA Drug Fact Sheet. http://www.dea.gov/druginfo/factsheets.shtml and counterfeit substances as defined in the Utah Controlled Substances Act, Utah Code § 58-37-2.

      1. Possessing (Personal or Property)
        1. First Violation
          A student possessing counterfeit substances for the first time will be suspended pending a meeting with the school administrator and parent(s) or guardian(s).  At the meeting, this policy will be reviewed and written documentation of the violation will be placed in the student’s disciplinary file.  The student will be readmitted to school after the meeting.
        2. Second Violation
          A student possessing counterfeit substances for the second time will be suspended from school pending a meeting with the school administrator and parent(s) or guardian(s).  At the meeting the student and parent(s) or guardian(s) will be given a choice between the following two disciplinary consequences:

          1. The student will be placed in a home-based alternative education program for ten (10) school days.  Parent(s) or guardian(s) will be required to coordinate homework assignments with a designated school representative.
          2. The student and his/her parent(s) or guardian(s) will enroll in a Jordan District First Offenders Drug and Alcohol Class.  The student will be able to return to school after attending the first session of the class.  Parent(s) or guardian(s) will be required to coordinate homework assignments with a designated school representative during the intervening time.  If the requirements of the class are not met, the student will automatically be placed in a home-based alternative education program for ten (10) school days less the number of school days missed during the intervening time between the violation and the first class session.
      2. Distributing (Selling, Sharing, or Delivering)
        1. First Violation
          A student distributing counterfeit substances for the first time will be suspended pending a meeting with the school administrator and parent(s) or guardian(s).  At the meeting, this policy will be reviewed.  Disciplinary consequences for distributing counterfeit substances will be a referral to the First Offenders Drug and Alcohol class.
        2. Second Violation
          A student distributing counterfeit substances for the second time will be suspended from school pending a meeting with the school administrator and parent(s) or guardian(s).  At the meeting, the student will be placed in a home-based alternative education program for ten (10) school days.
        3. Third Violation
          A student distributing counterfeit substances for the third time will be suspended from school pending a meeting with the school administrator and parent(s) or guardian(s).  At the meeting, the student will be placed in a home-based alternative education program for forty-five (45) school days.  In addition, the student who has a distribution violation must submit to a written assessment for potential substance dependence.  A confirmation of the assessment must be received by the administrator of the District’s Programs for At-Risk Students before the student is readmitted to school.
    4. Medication Substance Violations
      Definition: Medications in excess of a recommended eight (8)-hour dosage for which an individual has a prescription, or in any amount if the individual has no prescription or over-the-counter medications in excess of a recommended eight (8)-hour dosage.

      1. Possessing (Personal or Property)
        1. First Violation
          A student possessing medication substances as described above for the first time will be suspended pending a meeting with the school administrator and parent(s) or guardian(s).  At the meeting, this policy will be reviewed and written documentation of the violation will be placed in the student’s disciplinary file.  The student will be readmitted to school after the meeting.
        2. Second Violation
          A student possessing medication substances in excess of a recommended eight (8)-hour dosage for the second time will be suspended from school pending a meeting with the school administrator and parent(s) or guardian(s).  At the meeting the student and parent(s) or guardian(s) will be given a choice between the following two disciplinary consequences:

          1. The student will be placed in a home-based alternative education program for ten (10) school days.  Parent(s) or guardian(s) will be required to coordinate homework assignments with a designated school representative.
          2. The student and his/her parent(s) or guardian(s) will enroll in a Jordan District First Offenders Drug and Alcohol Class.  The student will be able to return to school after attending the first session of the class.  Parent(s) or guardian(s) will be required to coordinate homework assignments with a designated school representative during the intervening time.  If the requirements of the class are not met, the student will automatically be placed in a home-based alternative education program for ten (10) school days less the number of school days missed during the intervening time between the violation and the first class session.
      2. Distributing (Selling, Sharing, or Delivering)
        1. First Violation
          1. A student distributing any over-the-counter medications for the first time will be suspended pending a meeting with the school administrator and parent(s) or guardian(s).  At the meeting, this policy will be reviewed.  Disciplinary consequences for distributing over-the-counter medication will be determined by the school administration based on the severity of the violation.
          2. A student distributing prescription medications (for which the student distributing has a prescription) for the first time or over-the-counter medications for the second time will be suspended from school pending a meeting with the school administrator and parent(s) or guardian(s).  At the meeting, the student will be placed in a home-based alternative education program for forty-five (45) school days.  In addition, the student who has a distribution violation must submit to a written assessment for potential substance dependence.  A confirmation of the assessment must be received by the administrator of the District’s At-Risk Programs before the student is readmitted to school.
        2. Second Violation
          A student distributing prescription medications (for which the student distributing has a prescription) for the second time will be suspended from school pending a meeting with the school administrator and parent(s) or guardian(s).  At the meeting, the student will be placed in a home-based alternative education program for one-hundred eighty (180) school days.  In addition, the student who has a distribution violation must submit to a written assessment for potential substance dependence.  A confirmation of the assessment must be received by the administrator of the District’s Programs for At-Risk Students before the student is readmitted to school.
    1. Tobacco/Nicotine Violation
      Definition:  Illegal possession of cigarettes or any oral device that is composed of a heating element, battery, or electronic circuit and marketed, manufactured, distributed, or sold as an e-cigarette, vapor sticks, e-pipe, or any other product name or descriptor, if the function of the product meets the definition of an electronic oral device.  (Utah Code §76-10-1-101, 104, 105, 111).

      1. Tobacco, tobacco/nicotine products, e-cigarettes, and paraphernalia will be confiscated.
      2. Parent(s) or guardian(s) will be contacted by the school administrator.
      3. Compliance officers (administrators and school resource officers) will write a juvenile court citation if a student buys, attempts to buy, distributes, or is in possession of tobacco, tobacco/nicotine products, e-cigarettes, and paraphernalia.  All citations are referred to the court system.
      4. The juvenile court system will issue a fine for each possession of tobacco/nicotine products, e-cigarettes, or paraphernalia.  As the number of violations increase, the court may increase the amount of the fine.
    2. Procedures
      1. Due process procedures outlined in policy AS67 Discipline of Students will be followed in the administration of this policy.
      2. All illegal activity covered by this policy will be reported to an appropriate law enforcement agency.   Jordan School District will enforce the disciplinary consequences outlined in this policy independent of any court action.
      3. Students apprehended by school district employees or law enforcement officials for illegal violations covered by this policy while off-campus during regular school hours shall be subject to the provisions of this policy.
      4. Resorting occurs when a student is apprehended by school district employees or law enforcement officials for being present where alcohol or illegal substances as defined in this policy are being used or possessed and the use or possession is open, obvious, apparent, and not concealed.  Resorting violations may result in suspension.
      5. Students found in possession of drug paraphernalia as defined in Utah Code §58-37a-3 will be dealt with according to the “possession and use of illegal substances” section of this policy.
      6. During the time a student is on the home-based alternative education program, the student may not be a spectator or participant in any school-sponsored extra-curricular program or activity including those held off school property.
      7. If the designated days of home-based alternative education cannot be completed by the end of the regular school year, the home-based alternative education program must be completed at the beginning of the following school year.
      8. If a senior is placed on the home-based alternative education program, and that placement coincides with the end of the school year, the student will not be allowed to participate in graduation exercises.  The diploma will be awarded upon completion of the home-based alternative education program and all other graduation requirements.
      9. District personnel will assist with identifying appropriate agencies qualified to make written assessment of potential substance dependence for students who violate the provisions of this policy.  These assessments will be at the expense of the parent(s) or guardian(s).
      10. Records will be maintained on all violations.  A student with more than one violation will be considered a repeat offender even if the earlier violation(s) occurred in a prior school year or a different Jordan District school.
      11. In addition to the disciplinary consequences outlined in this policy, a student will be suspended or removed from participation in leadership positions, candidacy for leadership positions, school organizations, and athletic teams upon violations of the provisions covered in this policy.
      12. Utah Code §53A-11-4-403 requires educators to report information of suspected substance abuse among students to their parent(s) or guardian(s).
      13. Jordan School District will award credit for education when students are in drug and/or alcohol use treatment programs.  The treatment program must meet the Utah State Department of Human Services license qualifications.
        1. One (1.0) elective credit may be earned for completion of an in-patient treatment program.
        2. Required and elective credit may also be earned during in-patient treatment through participation in an accredited educational program.  A maximum of five and one-half (5.5) instructional hours per day may be applied toward credit.
        3. One (1.0) elective credit may be earned for participation in an approved aftercare program.  The student must submit a schedule of the aftercare program and verification of regular attendance.  One-quarter (.25) credit will be awarded for each forty-five (45) hours of aftercare participation.

  • Effective: 4/29/1986
  • Revision: 2/25/2014

  1. Board Directive
    The Board recognizes  that staff and students may come in contact with bloodborne pathogens and/or communicable diseases during the school day and delegates the responsibility for developing appropriate policy for the protection of staff and students.
  2. Administrative Policy
    The Administration authorizes the following administrative policy provisions for protection from bloodborne pathogens to staff and students:

    1. Bloodborne Pathogens 
      Since body fluids may contain a variety of potentially infectious organisms, it is important for all school personnel to know how to clean them up properly to prevent the spread of infection to students, other school personnel, and to themselves.

      1. All employees of Jordan School District are required to participate in annual instruction in using Universal Precautions when dealing with cleanup of all blood or body fluids.
      2. The Universal Precautions must be observed in the cleanup of all blood or body fluids.  All employees will treat all blood and body fluids as if known to be infected with HIV, HBV, and other bloodborne pathogens.
    2. Communicable Diseases
      Communicable diseases are a leading cause of childhood morbidity and school absences.  Students and staff with communicable diseases, which can be transmitted directly or indirectly from one individual to another, require special consideration in the school setting.  The transmission of infectious disease may be prevented by all school staff using procedures of effective infection control.  In the school environment, the risk of exposure can be unpredictable, thus control measure that are simple and uniform across all situations have the greatest likelihood of compliance and success.

      1. The spread of infectious disease can be prevented or deterred if students and staff adhere to basic principles of good personal hygiene, cleanliness, and recommended use of any necessary personal protective measures.
      2. Schools are legally authorized to prohibit school attendance by students, if necessary, to prevent the spread of contagious disease.
      3. Case management will inhibit the spread of contagious illness in school and minimize excessive absences.  Activities include:
        1. Identification
        2. Potential exclusion of students and staff with communicable diseases.
        3. Appropriate follow-up to ensure treatments and prompt readmission to school.
      4. The state health agency is responsible for initiating measures to suppress or prevent the spread of disease and for implementing regulation relating to quarantine, isolation, and other control measures to protect the public.
      5. Children with chronic infectious disease are entitled to a free appropriate public education in the least restrictive environment.  If a student will be absent from school due to an infectious disease, reasonable accommodation, which may include Home and Hospital program services, could be appropriate.
      6. Persons with suppressed immune systems run a higher than normal risk of severe complications from common communicable illnesses.
        1. Students with a suppressed immune system may need to be temporarily excluded from school when there is an outbreak of a communicable disease for their own protection.
        2. Students with a suppressed immune system should have an individual health care plan in place with specific guidelines that will be implemented in the event of an outbreak.
        3. The decision to exclude the student from school should be made by the District nurse in conjunction with the student’s parent(s), physician and local health department when necessary.
      7. The District nurses are responsible for providing schools with exclusion protocol.  The assigned District nurse is responsible to provide in-service education for the individual needs.
    3. Management of a Communicable Disease Program  
      Regardless of the specific disease, certain elements are critical to the management of a communicable disease program.

      1. All employees, including those with chronic infectious diseases, have a right to confidentiality and access to employment as well as other rights, privileges, and services provided by federal and state laws.
      2. All children, including those with chronic infectious diseases, have a right to confidentiality and a free and appropriate public education.  Students with chronic infectious diseases are eligible for all rights, privileges, and services provided by federal and state laws.
      3. Measures to isolate students with chronic infectious diseases are usually not necessary.  Irrational fears related to chronic infectious diseases can be mitigated through planned health education programs for school staff, students, and parents.  Education programs should include information regarding the mode of transmission and the methods of preventing the transmission of infectious diseases.
      4. The school should respect the right to privacy of the individual.  If a student has an infectious disease, such knowledge should be confined to those persons with a direct need to know.
        1. Those persons who are informed of the identity of an infected child should be made aware of confidentiality requirements.
        2. The identity of an individual with an infectious disease should not be revealed except as required by law for reporting purposes.
        3. Health records should be confidential.
      5. A student should never be discriminated against because of an infectious disease.
      6. In the event of an outbreak of a vaccine-preventable disease, in cooperation with the local department of health, all susceptible students (i.e., students with medical or religious exemption from immunization) must be excluded or immunized.
    4. Management by District Nurses
      Jordan School District nurses are the most appropriate persons to coordinate with the local health department.  They should be responsible for instituting measures to prevent or control the spread of communicable diseases.  Their knowledge and judgment are essential for the collection and interpretation of data related to infectious disease.  Jordan School District nurses should:

      1. Participate in the development and revision of infectious disease policies and procedures, and consult with local or state health department personnel as needed.
      2. Interpret infectious disease policies and procedures to school personnel, parents and students.
      3. Provide health information, and in-service programs regarding infectious diseases.
      4. Promote positive health practices for the school community.
      5. Develop individual health care plans for students with chronic infectious diseases.
      6. Recommend modification of the school program for infected students as needed.
      7. Monitor and assess students with infectious diseases
      8. Monitor and assess the school environment for the effective infection control standards.
      9. Make recommendations for purchase of proper equipment and supplies.
      10. Serve as an advocate for students with infectious diseases.
      11. Act as a liaison between the school, home, and medical/health agencies for the students with infectious diseases.
      12. Keep up with current information, rules and regulation, policies, and procedures related to infectious disease.

  • Effective: 5/23/1978
  • Revision: 2/25/2014

  1. Board Directive
    The Board of Education recognizes the importance of providing instruction to students who are confined to home or hospital.  The Board also recognizes the need to maintain contact between the school and the home during the time when these students are unable to attend school.  The Board, therefore, delegates to the Administration responsibility for developing policy for a Home and Hospital Instruction Program for students who are unable to attend school due to injury, illness or other extenuating circumstances.
  2. Administrative Policy
    The Administration shall establish a program to provide instruction to convalescing students in grades one through twelve to alleviate concern over academic work/credit, to maintain the skills necessary for returning to the classroom, and to assure ongoing home/school contact during the term of the illness, injury, or extenuating circumstances.  The District provides opportunities for short-term services through the student’s boundary school as well as long-term services for those students who may need extended out-of-school services.   The Home and Hospital Program will be administered according to the following administrative policy provisions:

    1. Qualifications for Services
      1. The student lives within the boundaries of Jordan School District and is enrolled in a Jordan District school.
      2. The student is confined at home or in a hospital due to physical or emotional illness, injury, handicap, complications of pregnancy, or extenuating circumstances.
      3. The student has missed or expects to miss ten (10) or more consecutive days of school.
      4. The student's condition will allow 50 percent or less attendance during the school day.
      5. Home and Hospital Instruction is recommended by the student's physician, medical professional, licensed clinical social worker, licensed psychotherapist, or legally directed services, and is requested by the parent(s)/guardian(s).
    2. Providing Services
      1. The parent will need to notify the administrator at the student’s school to inform them of the need for Home and Hospital services.  The school administrator will initiate the required procedures to begin the Home and Hospital services .  All required documentation will be submitted to the District prior to teacher reimbursement.
      2. The student's physician, medical professional, licensed social worker, or licensed psychotherapist shall be asked to estimate the length of time that Home and Hospital Instruction services will be needed.  Minimum duration of services is two weeks and maximum service is nine weeks without additional follow-up with referring medical provider.
      3. Short-term services will be initiated at the school by the building administrator.  The Request for Home and Hospital Instruction form, the Short-term Services Disclosure Statement, and the Professional Statement of Needs form need to be submitted to the District with the time sheet for the first month and the Monthly Teaching Record.
      4. Long-term services require the Home and Hospital Teacher Specialist to meet with the family and complete all required documentation to be submitted to the District Office with the time sheet for the first month and the Monthly Teaching Record.
      5. Home and Hospital Instruction services shall be provided for pregnant girls only when extenuating circumstances make it inadvisable or impossible for the student to participate at their boundary school or in the teenage parent program offered through Valley High School.
      6. Home and Hospital Instruction services may be denied or discontinued if it appears that the services are worsening the student's condition, increasing or prolonging school phobia or anxiety, or otherwise having a harmful impact upon the student.
      7. In most cases, the duration of services shall be determined by the administrator after consultation with the medical professional requesting Home and Hospital services per the medical release form.
      8. If it appears that the program is being abused by the parent or student, the administrator will initiate a formal review with the program consultant for Student Intervention Services or the District Administrator administering the Home and Hospital Program.
      9. Students attending schools that are on a year-round calendar will be provided Home and Hospital services only during the weeks when their assigned track is in session.
      10. Secondary students in grades 9-12 requiring long-term services of Home and Hospital (nine weeks or more) will be transferred to Valley High School.  The Home and Hospital instruction will be provided in the home or other designated public location (e.g., library, police or fire station) under the direction of the program consultant for Student Intervention Services.
      11. During the last two quarters of the school year, seniors who are on line for graduation and not involved in an extensive makeup program shall receive Home and Hospital services from their local school to enable the student to graduate from that school.
      12. Instruction for students who are expelled/suspended for drug and alcohol violations will be provided by the local school or Valley High School as specified in the District policies AS67— Discipline of Students  and AS90—Drugs and Alcohol.
      13. The District Appeals Committee may rule that some students will receive their education for a designated period of time through the Home and Hospital program as an alternative to their local school.  These services will be provided by either the local school or Valley High as directed by the Appeals Committee.
    3. Assignment of Teachers
      1. Short-term services:   Students shall be taught by teachers whenever possible, from the class and school in which they are enrolled.  When an appropriate teacher is not available, the administrator may arrange for a teacher from another school.
      2. School administrators shall make short-term Home and Hospital teaching assignments on the basis of teacher interest, availability, and curriculum qualifications.
        1. Teachers shall be reimbursed for providing Home and Hospital Instruction at their current hourly base rate.
        2. One half hour of preparation time is allowed for each two hours of actual instruction.
        3. Teachers shall receive a mileage reimbursement at the current district rate.  Mileage is based upon the distance from the school to the student's home or other designated public location (e.g., library, police or fire station) and to the instructor’s home.  If visiting multiple students on the same trip, mileage shall also be paid for the distance between students’ homes/locations when necessary. Time required for travel is not part of the two-hour instruction time.
        4. Teachers  shall submit the required documentation accessed online, each month prior to being reimbursed for services.
        5. The administrators shall submit time sheets for Home and Hospital Instruction along with the designated copy of the Home and Hospital Teaching Record Form signed by the parent to the Curriculum Office
      3. Long-term teacher assignment will be determined by the District Administrator over Home and Hospital  to meet individual student needs.
    4. Instruction
      1. Home Instruction
        1. Instruction shall be provided at the student's home or other designated public location (e.g., library, police or fire station) after regular school hours for short-term services and during the school day or after regular school hours for long-term services.  Generally, one two-hour instruction session shall be provided per week.  With administrator  approval, two one-hour sessions may be provided if it is deemed in the best interest of the student.  (One-hour sessions are generally only used with elementary-age students.)
        2. A parent or other responsible adult must be present in the home during the instruction session.  If the parent or guardian fails to provide proper chaperonage, the instruction session shall be canceled.
        3. Textbooks shall be furnished by the school where the student is enrolled. When appropriate. additional coursework will be provided through the Curriculum Department..
      2. Hospital Instruction
        1. Jordan District shall provide teachers, textbooks, and instructional materials for students confined to approved non-accredited facilities.
        2. Students enrolled in Jordan District and later assigned to hospitals with accredited educational programs shall be serviced in one of two ways:
          1. Withdrawn from Jordan School District and transferred to the accredited institution which will provide teachers, textbooks and instructional materials.
          2. Assigned to Valley High (Home & Hospital) but serviced at the facility by an accredited institution under a contract with Jordan School District based upon a daily pro-rated amount of the WPU.  Teachers, textbooks, and instructional materials shall be provided by the institution under contract.
    5. Grades and Credit for School Attendance
      1. Students who are receiving Home and Hospital Instruction shall be counted as attending school.
      2. Secondary teachers must prepare assignment sheets for students in their classes who are receiving Home and Hospital Instruction.  Teachers are accountable to provide Utah State Core curriculum educational services. Substitute assignments will be provided if the regular class activities cannot be completed at home.  Upon consultation with the school administration, the teacher can give the student an "incomplete" for the course when it cannot be appropriately taught through Home and Hospital Instruction.  In this case, the District would provide an opportunity for the student to make up the missed credit through an alternative class or program.  Because of limited instructional time, the Home and Hospital Instruction Program is designed to help students maintain credit.
      3. Middle school and high school students who receive Home and Hospital Instruction for five weeks or more during any one quarter shall receive attendance credit and grades for work completed from the Home and Hospital instructors, and the Home and Hospital specialist, in collaboration with the content classroom teacher.  Grades shall be awarded by the Home and Hospital teacher and specialist in collaboration with the classroom content teacher.

  • Effective: 11/11/1977
  • Revision: 5/24/2016
  • Reviewed: 12/10/2013

  1. Board Directive
    The Board recognizes that some students need to receive medication during the school day and delegates to the Administration responsibility for developing appropriate policy for administering medication to students in accordance with Utah Code Title 53A Chapter 11 Part 6 and for the self-administration of medication by the student.  A summary of policy AS85 - Medication in the School Setting and the District’s procedures guidelines “Administering Medications at School” will be provided to parents and/or guardians on a yearly basis.
  2. Administrative Policy
    The Administration authorizes the following administrative policy provisions for administering medication to students.

    1. School Personnel Administering Medication:
      1. School personnel may administer prescription medication or nonprescription (over-the-counter) medication to a student during the regular school day as specified in the District’s procedures guidelines “Administering Medications at School” and in accordance with Utah Code Title 53A Chapter 11 Part 6. “Administering Medications at School” guidelines shall include provisions for the designation and training of volunteer employees who may administer medication, the proper identification and safekeeping of medication, the maintenance of records of administration and notification to the school nurse of medication that will be administered to students.
      2.  In the event of a medical emergency, the school must call 911.
    2. Self-Administration of Medication
      1. Self-administration of medication by students shall be allowed under the procedures specified in "Administering Medications at School.”
      2. Distribution of any drug or medication from one student to another will be considered Dangerous and Disruptive Conduct and shall be dealt with according to the provisions of Policy AS90—Drugs and Alcohol.

  • Effective: 6/28/1977
  • Revision: 2/25/2014

  1. Board Directive
    The Board recognizes that maintaining a high level of immunization among the students contributes to the health and well-being of the total community.  Therefore, the Board authorizes the Administration to establish immunization screening procedures and to exclude from school those students who are not either immunized or exempted as required by Utah Code Ann. §53A-11-301 et seq. and any applicable Utah Department of Health rules.
  2. Administration Policy
    The Administration shall be responsible for establishing policy by which the level of immunization of all students can be determined and appropriate action can be taken in cases where immunization levels do not comply with the law.

    1. Local schools shall be responsible to monitor the immunization records and compliance of all students.  District nurses shall serve as advisers to the school in this process.
    2. A student may not enter school without a certificate of immunization from a licensed physician or authorized representative of the state or local health department stating that the student has received immunization against communicable diseases as required by rules adopted by the Utah Department of Health unless the student qualifies for a conditional enrollment or an exemption from immunization as follows:
      1. Conditional Enrollment
        A student who at the time of school enrollment has not been completely immunized against each disease specified by the Utah Department of Health may attend school under a conditional enrollment if the student has received one dose of each specified vaccine prior to enrollment and is on schedule for subsequent immunizations.  A military child, as defined in Utah Code §53A-1-1001, shall be given 30 days from the day of enrollment to receive one dose of each specified vaccine and to be on schedule for subsequent immunizations.  If subsequent immunizations are one calendar month past due, the student may no longer be conditionally enrolled and shall be excluded from school (Utah Department of Health Rule 396-100-7).  The student's parent, guardian, a legal-age brother or sister of a student who is without parent or guardian, or the student if of legal age shall ensure that immunizations are completed on schedule and provide satisfactory evidence to the school that the student's immunization has been obtained.

        1. Conditional Enrollment Review
          The immunization status of those students enrolled conditionally shall be reviewed by the school every 30 days to ensure conformed compliance (Utah Department of Health Rule 396-100-7).
        2. Exclusion of Conditionally Enrolled Students
          Students enrolled conditionally shall be excluded from school if the school is not provided with appropriate documentation of adequate immunization being completed on schedule.  Exclusion from school shall begin five days after the conditional enrollment time period expires.  Within these five days, the school shall mail to the last known address of a parent, guardian, or legal-age brother or sister of a student who is without parent or guardian a final written notice of pending suspension and of the student's right to file for an exemption.
        3. Referral to Juvenile Court
          Parents or guardians of children who are prohibited from attending school for failure to comply with the provisions of conditional enrollment shall be referred to the juvenile court.
      2. Exemption from Immunization
        A student is exempt from receiving the required immunization if there is presented to the school one or more of the following:

        1. A Utah State Medical Exemption form from a licensed health care provider stating that due to the physical condition of the student one or more specified immunizations would endanger the student's life or health.
        2. An official Utah State Personal Exemption form obtained at the local health department where the student resides indicating that the person has a personal belief opposed to immunizations.
        3. An official Utah State Religious Exemption form obtained at the local health department where the student resides indicating that the person is a bona fide member of a specified, recognized religious organization whose teachings are contrary to immunizations. (Utah Code Ann. §53A-11-302).
      3. The administration will comply with the McKinney-Vento Act (see Policy AS63(II)(F) – Student Eligibility to Attend School.)
    3. With respect to any student for whom a school does not have a Utah School Immunization Record, the school shall notify by mail, telephone or in person the parent, guardian, a legal-age brother or sister of a student who is without parent or guardian, or the student if of legal age, at least 30 days before school begins that:
      1. The school has no Utah School Immunization Record for the student.
      2. The school may not admit the student without proof of immunization or evidence that the student qualifies for conditional enrollment or is exempted on medical, personal or religious grounds.
      3. The student may be immunized and receive certification by a private physician or public health authorities.
      4. Immunizations are available from the local health department.
    4. Students moving into Utah during the summer shall be notified of these requirements at the time of first registration.
    5. Each school shall maintain on file an official Utah School Immunization Record for each student or a Utah Department of Health Personal Exemption Form if the student claims a personal exemption.  A copy of the certificate shall be made available to the parent or guardian, or the student is of legal age, when the student withdraws, transfers, is promoted, or otherwise leaves the school, or the school shall transfer the certificate with the student's school record to the new school.
    6. The principal shall identify all who have not completed their immunization program as outlined by the State Board of Health and notify the coordinator of Educational Support Services of any students who are excluded from school because of failure to meet immunization requirements.
    7. During the first week of August, elementary schools shall notify middle schools and middle schools shall notify high schools of any incoming students who have not met the immunization requirements.
    8. Exclusions of students who are under exemption or conditionally enrolled status will follow Utah Code Ann. §53A-11-302 and Utah Department of Health Rule 396-100-8.